57 Days Until Mid Term Elections

Two terms that we hear thrown around a lot are PAC (Political Action Committee) and Super PAC but some don't know the difference. Here is a quick breakdown.

Political Action Committee (PAC)

Political Action Committee (PAC) — A popular term for a political committee organized for the purpose of raising and spending money to elect and defeat candidates. Most PACs represent business, labor or ideological interests. PACs can give $5,000 to a candidate committee per election (primary, general or special). They can also give up to $15,000 annually to any national party committee, and $5,000 annually to any other PAC. PACs may receive up to $5,000 from any one individual, PAC or party committee per calendar year. A PAC must register with the FEC within 10 days of its formation, providing name and address for the PAC, its treasurer and any connected organizations. Affiliated PACs are treated as one donor for the purpose of contribution limits.

PACs have been around since 1944, when the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) formed the first one to raise money for the re-election of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The PAC's money came from voluntary contributions from union members rather than union treasuries, so it did not violate the Smith Connally Act of 1943, which forbade unions from contributing to federal candidates. Although commonly called PACs, federal election law refers to these accounts as "separate segregated funds" because money contributed to a PAC is kept in a bank account separate from the general corporate or union treasury.

Many politicians also form Leadership PACs as a way of raising money to help fund other candidates' campaigns. Since June 2008, Leadership PACs reporting electronically must list the candidate sponsoring the PAC, as per the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007. Leadership PACs are often indicative of a politician's aspirations for leadership positions in Congress or for higher office. 

(Source OpenSecrets.org)

Super PAC

Super PACs are a relatively new type of committee that arose following the July 2010 federal court decision in a case known as SpeechNow.org v. Federal Election Commission.

Technically known as independent expenditure-only committees, super PACs may raise unlimited sums of money from corporations, unions, associations, and individuals, then spend unlimited sums to overtly advocate for or against political candidates. Unlike traditional PACs, super PACs are prohibited from donating money directly to political candidates, and their spending must not be coordinated with that of the candidates they benefit. Super PACs are required to report their donors to the Federal Election Commission on a monthly or semiannual basis – the super PAC's choice – in off-years, and monthly in the year of an election.

(Source OpenSecrets.org)


In essence, PACs raise money and often work with candidates to support issues and platforms while Super PACs are considered the dark money of politics because they raise unlimited funds to spend however they want as long as they don't work directly with candidates. Many churches, church leaders and religious organizations are establishing PACs to support the candidates and issues whose agendas best reflect their constituents. A common complaint is that the funds invested in PACs and Super PACs often outweigh the voice of the people, especially those with opposing views, therefore, donating to PACs can help to level the playing field. Visit our Resource page for potential organizations to donate to or consider donating to #ZionVotes to help with our Get Out The Vote efforts.

LaKesha Womack